xvid entertainment news tecnologia e tempo libero

28May/150

JXE Streams: Join us for some ‘Affordable Space Adventures’

KnapNok Games gets what Richard Branson doesn't. Of course people want to hang out in space, but they definitely don't want to pay top dollar to do it! So rather than drop $200,000 on a Virgin Galactic reservation, why not fire up your Wii U for some Affordable Space Adventures? The game simulates the existential nightmare of getting trapped on a foreign planet as well as makes novel use of the console's unique tablet controller. It's win-win! Join us at 3:30PM ET today for a live tour of the game on JXE Streams.

Tune in right here, at Engadget.com/gaming and on Twitch.tv/Joystiq to catch 90 straight minutes of poor ship piloting and space madness.

Enjoy the streams? Follow us on Twitch.tv/Joystiq to know whenever we go live!

[We're streaming Affordable Space Adventures through an Elgato HD via OBS at 720p.]

http://www.engadget.com/2015/05/28/jxe-streams-affordable-space-adventures/?ncid=rss_truncated

Filed under: Tecnology No Comments
28May/150

Google intros new Jump VR platform and improved Cardboard

Google brought virtual reality to the masses cheaply with Cardboard, a DIY headset announced at last year's I/O conference. Now, the search giant's building upon its 1 million VR viewers with an improved Cardboard headset that fits smartphone screens up to 6 inches. It also incorporates a new top-mounted button that replaces the finicky magnetic ring so that Cardboard works with any phone. And, in what's probably the most consumer-friendly move Google's made with the new and improved Cardboard, it takes just three steps to assemble. Clay Bavor, VP of Product, told I/O attendees that they'd be receiving these new DIY VR kits immediately after the keynote. And for interested VR developers, it's important to note the Cardboard SDK now works with iOS in addition to Android.

Google Cardboard / Expeditions / Jump

Google also announced Jump, its new VR platform for creating and sharing content due out sometime this summer for "select creators." It's the company's way of giving professional-grade VR content-creation tools to the masses so that anyone can capture and share 3D video. To do this, Google's partnered with GoPro to build Jump's first 3D camera rig. As Bavor explained onstage, the software works by seamlessly stitching video frames together for a border-free, depth-corrected immersive VR experience that can be easily uploaded and viewed on YouTube.

Jump also happens to be the perfect software companion for Expeditions, Google's just-announced initiative to bring these VR experiences to educators so that "teachers [can] take their classes on field trips to anywhere." Google didn't reveal much about how Expeditions will work or how it'll roll out to schools, but it's clear from today's announcement that Google's taking VR very seriously.

Don't miss out on all the latest news and updates from Google I/O 2015. Follow along at our events page.

http://www.engadget.com/2015/05/28/google-updates-vr-jump-cardboard/?ncid=rss_truncated

Filed under: Tecnology No Comments
28May/150

GoPro unveils a 360-degree camera array for VR videos

Now that Google has announced Jump, a new VR technology platform that lets you create and share 3D content, you're probably wondering how you can do exactly that. Well, Google has partnered with GoPro to come up with a solution: a 360-degree camera array built out of 16 GoPros. The circular rig boasts camera syncing, multi-camera control and a super-long battery life so it can stand out there to capture as much crazy 3D footage as you can conjure up. From there, you can just hand over the video to Google's Jump software and it'll process it for you. And, if you like, you can share it with the world so that anyone with a VR headset -- Cardboard or not -- will be able to see it. We're hearing from Google that the 360-degree camera will be seeded out to a few select YouTubers at least initially, but it'll eventually be up for purchase to any and all wannabe VR content creators. Meanwhile, you should check out the video below to see an interactive (use your keyboard or mouse to look all around you) 3D video shot with the GoPro 360-degree camera array.

GoPro 360-degree camera array

http://www.engadget.com/2015/05/28/gopro-360-degree-camera-array-for-vr/?ncid=rss_truncated

Filed under: Tecnology No Comments
28May/150

Android app makers can experiment with Play Store listings

Those rumors of Google letting Android app developers experiment with what you see in the Play Store? Yes, they're true. Creators can now conduct tests to see what pricing works best, or whether one icon color is more alluring than others -- you'll only view one of each while the test is ongoing. Also, app makers are getting Developer Pages (shown above) that showcase all of their apps, so you'll have a one-stop shop for everything from your preferred brand. If all goes well, you'll find more Android apps with prices you're willing to pay, and you won't have to scrounge quite so much to get every app you need.

Don't miss out on all the latest news and updates from Google I/O 2015. Follow along at our events page.

http://www.engadget.com/2015/05/28/google-play-store-experiments-and-pages/?ncid=rss_truncated

Filed under: Tecnology No Comments
28May/150

Google Cardboard now works on iOS

At the I/O developers conference this morning, Google announced that its low-cost VR headset, dubbed Cardboard, is now available for (official) use with the Apple operating system. The system has only been available for the Android OS since its debut at last year's I/O conference. Its associated app, however, has been downloaded more than a million times since then.

This year's headset iteration also sports some additional design improvements. The unit, for example, now accommodates phones with screen sizes of up to six inches. Its assembly has also been streamlined from 12 steps to just three. The unit's magnetic "switch" was revamped to work with all phones (and is now actually made of cardboard as well). You can download Cardboard for iOS from iTunes right now.

Don't miss out on all the latest news and updates from Google I/O 2015. Follow along at our events page.

http://www.engadget.com/2015/05/28/google-cardboard-is-coming-to-ios/?ncid=rss_truncated

Filed under: Tecnology No Comments
28May/150

NVIDIA starts selling its Android TV-powered Shield media hub

Been jonesing for a very high-powered, Android TV-based media hub? You now have a chance to do something about that craving, as NVIDIA has started selling its Shield set-top box in North America. Pay $199 and you'll get the regular Shield, whose tiny 16GB of storage makes it clear that you'll be streaming a lot of 4K Netflix videos and playing games in the cloud through NVIDIA's GRID service. You'll need to pony up for the $299 Shield Pro to get loads of built-in storage (500GB) for local content, although you'll also get a copy of Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel in the bargain. And don't worry about buying content to get started -- both Shields come with a $30 Google Play gift card and three months of Google Play Music, so you'll have something to do as soon as you've pulled off the shrink wrap.

http://www.engadget.com/2015/05/28/nvidia-shield-available/?ncid=rss_truncated

Filed under: Tecnology No Comments
28May/150

A taste of something great: five days with NVIDIA’s Shield Android TV

I wanted to watch The West Wing, so I asked for it. I wanted to play Asphalt 8 on my TV, so I downloaded it. I wanted people to see me playing a copy of Street Fighter X Tekken I didn't (strictly speaking) own, so I broadcasted it. All of these little interactions -- some mundane, some seemingly strange -- are what make using NVIDIA's Shield Android TV box such a tantalizing experience. At its very core, it's not all that different from the Nexus Player we saw last year, with an added veneer of NVIDIA gamer-friendliness. It's that extra dose of ambition, though, that makes the Shield the most interesting Android TV box you'll find out there right now. I've had the thing hooked up to my TV for five days and haven't completely put it through its paces yet, but read on for a taste of what it's like having a Shield-powered living room.

NVIDIA Shield Android TV

We can zip through the broad strokes pretty quickly. With sharp, angular lines and a pulsating green light (I think of it as an eye) etched into its side, the Shield would be downright imposing if it weren't the size of a paperback. Setting up the Shield for the first time? Dead simple. Its back is festooned with connections: three full-size USB ports, one micro-USB, an HDMI-out, a Gigabit Ethernet jack and a slot for a microSD card. That last bit will come in handier for some of you than others, since the Shield comes in two flavors: a $199 version with 16GB of internal storage and a $299 model with 500GB of space. Once everything's connected, you'll be prompted to log in with your Google account, et voilà: you're all set.

If I'm being honest, Android TV hasn't changed all that much since we first saw it last year -- your apps, content and settings are laid out in rows you can navigate with the included Shield controller, but the magic really happens when you thumb the green NVIDIA logo. Once you do that, it's time to search for something, anything using your voice, and that's where Android TV seriously shines. Oscar winners from 1995? Recent movies starring Chiwetel Ejiofor? Game Sack? Shield picked up on every one of those requests with ease and brought up a slew of content cards related to those requests. If anything, it seemed a little more accurate than when we mucked around with the Nexus Player, which would occasionally throw in a few off-the-wall cards for reasons we couldn't quite crack. We have, however, figured out how some errant bits fit into the TV experience.

Remember that "Live Channels" Android TV app that popped up in the Play Store late last year? The one that basically promised to route actual, live television through your tiny Android box? Well, if you hook a TV tuner like the ones made by SiliconDust up to a Shield, the app will become accessible and you'll be treated to a sleek, blue interface showing off what's playing. What's more important, you'll actually be able to watch those shows live -- some people figured out the right tuner would kinda, sorta unlock that functionality on the Nexus Player, but it couldn't properly decode high-definition broadcast video. If you're like me, though, you've got a pricey cable contract and little need for a standalone TV tuner setup.

NVIDIA Shield Android TV software

If we take a step back from there, we're left with my major Shield sticking point: In order to squeeze the most out of the thing, you'll need some extra hardware. The Shield, for instance, is the first Android TV box to support 4K video streaming thanks to working relationships with companies like Netflix. Hook up a Shield to a 4K television, fire up Netflix, and you'll see certain titles highlighted with an UltraHD badge -- one quick click from there and you're watching House of Cards in glorious super-high resolution. (Other UHD content providers, like Amazon, haven't made their stuff available here yet). Thing is, I don't have a 4K television. Most people in the US don't, though we're finally getting to the point where you can buy one without melting your credit card. All the videos I tried in a hotel suite with NVIDIA reps floating around looked gorgeous, but it's not something many of us will be able to immediately appreciate. I don't have one of NVIDIA's GTX-series graphics cards either -- again, like most people -- so the finer points of streaming games straight from my PC to an Android set-top box were lost on me. Even the excellent Shield remote control, which feels really sturdy and has a great microphone, will set you back an extra $50.

I'll be putting those features through the wringer in our full review (coming soon!), but I was still pretty pleased with the out-of-box gaming experience Shield brings to your TV stand. Titles like SoulCalibur, Asphalt 8 and even Doom III ran great on my 47-inch LG thanks to the Tegra X1 chipset and the 256-core Maxwell GPU thrumming away in that angular body. The number of games optimized to run with this sort of horsepower on screens this large is still modest, though graphically intense games like Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance and Half-Life 2: Episode 2 are currently slated for summer launches. At this point, it's honestly hard to say if the Shield has the chops to depose full-blown game consoles, but it's sure as hell trying.

The biggest gaming question mark for me was whether or not I'd be able to use NVIDIA's Grid cloud gaming service, which promises to let you play games powered by remote hardware at full HD and at 60 frames per second. My home router -- a mostly new Apple Airport Extreme -- definitely wasn't one of the models NVIDIA recommended for Grid use. A bit of on-screen griping later, and I still managed to play through several rounds of Street Fighter X Tekken without too many dropped frames, though I spent most of my time laying down Hurricane-Kick-to-Hadouken-to-Dragon-Punch combos on computer opponents. We'll see what happens when we drag other humans into the mix, but I was a little shocked at just how well everything worked considering my subpar setup.

It's been less than a week, but I'm utterly intrigued by this new Shield. The original was a clunky portable that turned out to be a seriously hardy gaming companion. Its successor of sorts wound up being one of our favorite Android tablets. I'm withholding final judgment for just a little while longer, but it feels like the third time for NVIDIA really might be the charm, and that's saying something.

http://www.engadget.com/2015/05/28/nvidia-shield-tv-hands-on/?ncid=rss_truncated

Filed under: Tecnology No Comments
28May/150

Acer outs three new models of its Liquid Leap wearable

Last month, Acer teased a trio of new wearables in New York City. Today it's making them official. Enter the Liquid Leap Active, Leap Curve and Leap Fit, all designed with fitness, activity tracking and removable bands in mind. The Fit is the only one with a heart rate sensor, though, while the Curve and Active focus on offering features such as a curved display and sleep pattern-monitoring, respectively. Acer's staying mum on pricing and availability right now, but the company did say we'll learn those details at Computex 2015 next week. In the meantime, at least there's some eye candy to hold you over until then.

Liquid Leap Active.

Liquid Leap Curve.

http://www.engadget.com/2015/05/28/acer-liquid-leap-active-fit-curve/?ncid=rss_truncated

Filed under: Tecnology No Comments
28May/150

DARPA wants you to help with its terrifying schemes… by gaming

If you like playing online games, then you too can help birth some (possibly sinister) software from DARPA. The US Army's slightly insane research division launched its Verigames web portal in late 2013 with five free online games designed to crowdsource coding. How? Like a similar effort that folded AIDS proteins, the games "translate players' actions into program annotations," to kill numerous bugs in systems code, according to DARPA. The first experiment was a success and "produced hundreds of thousands of (code) annotations," so the agency plans to expand the program with five new games.

They're not exactly mindless shooters, though. You'll be tasked to "energize mysterious patterns in a cosmic puzzle machine," "optimize vast networks," and "match quarks in the name of cyber-security," to cite a few examples. If that's your idea of a good time, you can sign up, check out the games here and fire them up in your browser. It's all good fun in the name of science, unless you end up contributing to the rise of some pretty scary machines.

http://www.engadget.com/2015/05/28/darpa-verigames-crowdsourced-coding/?ncid=rss_truncated

Filed under: Tecnology No Comments
28May/150

Google I/O 2015: the numbers you need to know

Didn't fancy sitting through the whole liveblog from this year's Google I/O keynote? We understand. Sometimes you just want to catch they key plays via the post-game show. And that's kinda why Engadget exists, after all. As always with Google's big developer event, there was a lot of ground covered in a relatively short space of time. Fear not, below are the things we think you most need to know.

Google I/O 2015 keynote in numbers

http://www.engadget.com/2015/05/28/google-i-o-2015-the-numbers/?ncid=rss_truncated

Filed under: Tecnology No Comments