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23Apr/170

The best toaster

Who should buy this

You're probably looking for a new toaster because your old one bit the dust. Or maybe it toasts unevenly, can't accommodate bagels, or doesn't fit with your kitchen anymore. If you use a toaster oven and it dries out your bread, switching to the intense, direct heat of a toaster can give you a nice char while keeping the bread's texture intact.

If you need something more versatile and capable than a two-slot toaster, you're better off getting a toaster oven, which can handle some (if not all) of the tasks that a full-size oven can tackle. However, if you have a large family and you don't want to invest in (or don't have room for) a large toaster oven, four-slot toasters are the way to go. With double the capacity, four-slot toasters allow you to produce more toast fast, which is nice if you have a lot of mouths to feed.

How we picked and tested

For our 2016 update, we tested toasters using white sandwich bread, bagels, Eggo waffles, and English muffins. Photo: Michael Hession

The ideal toaster should toast bread evenly and consistently without a whole lot of fuss. Every slot should give you similar performance, and you should be able to toast breads of different types and shapes, which means having a big enough slot to handle thick bagels plus a way to retrieve small English muffins without jamming utensils (or your fingers) into the slots. You should be able to control the toast's darkness, and it's essential to have a cancel button that can easily cut off power mid-toast.

For this guide, we tested two- and four-slot toasters between $30 and $180. However, in our research, we found that many of the high-end toasters that cost upwards of $100 don't offer much more than those costing less than half the price.

Ideally, we wanted to find a slot toaster for under $50, especially because they are really a lo-fi, single-purpose appliance. In most cases, we were able to make perfectly fine toast with much cheaper machines.

For our testing, we used uniform slices of basic white bread from Bimbo and Wonder. We did three back-to-back batches at a middle-shade setting, which showed us how consistent the toast could be from model to model and batch to batch. This also showed how well the toasters could self-regulate their temperature once they're heated up.

We judged toast on its top-to-bottom and side-to-side evenness. We evaluated the accuracy of the shade settings—would most breakfast eaters consider these results medium, or were they too light or too burned? We also bit into the test toast to evaluate its texture and taste, looking for slices that had a lightly charred and crispy exterior and a warm interior that didn't feel too dried out or stiff.

To test the toasters' features beyond basic white bread, we tried out their bagel modes on everything bagels fresh from Murray's and frozen waffles. For more on how we picked and tested, see our full guide.

The best two-slot toaster

The Oster Jelly Bean is our pick for the best two-slot toaster. Photo: Michael Hession

Our pick for the best toaster is the Oster Jelly Bean. This simple, inexpensive two-slot model toasted bread, bagels, and waffles better than all of the competition in this price range. Unlike some toasters we tested, the slots are wide enough to fit thick, hand-cut bagels without needing to force them down. The plastic controls are easy to use and stay cool to the touch even during multiple rounds of toasting. Also, the Oster was one of the smallest toasters we tested, so it's ideal for kitchens with limited counter space.

The Oster toasted evenly from top to bottom and slot to slot, while pricier machines with the same nichrome heating element put out inconsistent results. In three successive batches, our Oster toast results were mostly consistent, with some darker patches on the second batch. This wasn't the case with the Cuisinart CPT-440 we tested, which toasted bread inconsistently from batch to batch.

A pricier toaster with more features

Our upgrade pick is the Breville BTA720XL. Photo: Michael Hession

If you want a high-end toaster with more features, we recommend the Breville BTA720XL. Though it's more than twice the price of our main pick, our testers found that the Breville toasts bread and bagels more evenly. The Breville also stands out because it allows you to check the degree of doneness, with the option to add 30 seconds more to the toasting cycle. Also, its handsome steel casing has a classic look that would fit the aesthetic of almost any kitchen.

The Breville delivers a more even toasting performance than the Oster, with uniform browning from top to bottom. While the Oster slightly scorched the edges of the second round of toast in back-to-back tests, the Breville's results were a bit darker but not burnt. Bagels also turned out better using the Breville, because the toaster's bagel mode is more precise with how it heats each side of the bagel. If you follow an onboard legend that tells you which direction to insert a sliced bagel, you can get a nicely darkened sliced side and a round side that's warmed but not overdone.

A four-slot toaster for larger households

The Oster 4-Slice offers double the capacity and consistent toasting results. Photo: Michael Hession

If you need a four-slot toaster, we recommend the affordably priced Oster 4-Slice. This model toasts bread very evenly, even after multiple batches. Like most models we tested, you'll need to adjust the heat setting slightly for bagels, English muffins, and Eggos, but it provides consistent results every time. Additionally, this stainless steel model has a classic look and wouldn't be an eyesore if stored on a kitchen counter.

In our tests, the Oster 4-Slice toasted bread almost as well as, if not better than models costing three and four times as much. Toast comes out perfectly golden brown, with a crisp exterior and a warm interior that isn't dried out. Though the Oster 4-Slice toasts more evenly than most other models we tried in the price range, it does leave a small area around the perimeter of the bread untoasted. However, for the price, we don't think this is a dealbreaker.

A heavy-duty four-slot toaster

Our upgrade pick for a four-slot toaster, the Breville BTA840XL. Photo: Michael Hession

If you want a four-slot toaster that consistently makes evenly browned toast with every batch, the Breville BTA840XL is hands down the best that we tried. Though it's pricier and takes up more space than the Oster four-slot toaster, the Breville offers more features than any other two- or four-slot model we tested.

This guide may have been updated by The Sweethome. To see the current recommendation, please go here.

Note from The Sweethome: When readers choose to buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn affiliate commissions that support our work.

Article source: https://www.engadget.com/2017/04/23/the-best-toaster/

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23Apr/170

‘The Last Goodbye’ is the VR Holocaust memorial we need today

"I think that you have to confront pain to be able to heal it," Gutter says in the film. "Unless you have somebody that can say, 'I was here, I saw this, this was done to me,' I don't think people would accept it as the gospel truth."

The Last Goodbye, a co-production by the Shoah Foundation, Here Be Dragons, MPC VR and OTOY, is a 16-minute-long experience that combines 360-degree video and photorealistic interactive environments from Majdanek. The studios captured tens of thousands of photos and spent five months painstakingly reconstructing them virtually. And, in a VR first, they also recorded high-quality stereo video of Gutter on-location, which results in an avatar that can believably make eye contact with you. All of that makes The Last Goodbye a VR journey that's as painful as it is immersive.

David Korins, the set designer for the musical Hamilton, developed the installation for The Last Goodbye. It's the size of a small room, with a mirrored exterior that makes it stand out from the plethora of VR showpieces at Tribeca. Going through the experience involves much more than just donning a VR headset: After walking down a small hallway, I met a guide who directed me to take off my shoes as a sign of respect. I then crossed a threshold of pebbles and stepped into the room, which had bare walls and cool ambient lighting. My guide, in a calm and collected voice, described the basics of the experience to me, helped me set up the headset, and left me alone. I took a deep breath and braced myself for what would likely be an emotionally painful journey.

The Last Goodbye begins in Gutter's hotel room, where he's steeling himself for the upcoming trip. He was first sent there with his family when he was 11, and he describes, in heartbreaking detail, the process of how they were stuffed onto a train car with dozens other families. As I started to explore an interactive model of one of those trains, the horrors of the Nazi's genocidal campaign against the Jewish people came starkly into focus. Someone built this thing just to efficiently ship families to their doom.

Article source: https://www.engadget.com/2017/04/22/the-last-goodbye-vr/

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23Apr/170

‘The Last Goodbye’ is the VR Holocaust memorial we need today

"I think that you have to confront pain to be able to heal it," Gutter says in the film. "Unless you have somebody that can say, 'I was here, I saw this, this was done to me,' I don't think people would accept it as the gospel truth."

The Last Goodbye, a co-production by the Shoah Foundation, Here Be Dragons, MPC VR and OTOY, is a 16-minute-long experience that combines 360-degree video and photorealistic interactive environments from Majdanek. The studios captured tens of thousands of photos and spent five months painstakingly reconstructing them virtually. And, in a VR first, they also recorded high-quality stereo video of Gutter on-location, which results in an avatar that can believably make eye contact with you. All of that makes The Last Goodbye a VR journey that's as painful as it is immersive.

David Korins, the set designer for the musical Hamilton, developed the installation for The Last Goodbye. It's the size of a small room, with a mirrored exterior that makes it stand out from the plethora of VR showpieces at Tribeca. Going through the experience involves much more than just donning a VR headset: After walking down a small hallway, I met a guide who directed me to take off my shoes as a sign of respect. I then crossed a threshold of pebbles and stepped into the room, which had bare walls and cool ambient lighting. My guide, in a calm and collected voice, described the basics of the experience to me, helped me set up the headset, and left me alone. I took a deep breath and braced myself for what would likely be an emotionally painful journey.

The Last Goodbye begins in Gutter's hotel room, where he's steeling himself for the upcoming trip. He was first sent there with his family when he was 11, and he describes, in heartbreaking detail, the process of how they were stuffed onto a train car with dozens other families. As I started to explore an interactive model of one of those trains, the horrors of the Nazi's genocidal campaign against the Jewish people came starkly into focus. Someone built this thing just to efficiently ship families to their doom.

Article source: https://www.engadget.com/2017/04/22/the-last-goodbye-vr/

Filed under: Tecnology No Comments
23Apr/170

‘The Last Goodbye’ is the VR Holocaust memorial we need today

"I think that you have to confront pain to be able to heal it," Gutter says in the film. "Unless you have somebody that can say, 'I was here, I saw this, this was done to me,' I don't think people would accept it as the gospel truth."

The Last Goodbye, a co-production by the Shoah Foundation, Here Be Dragons, MPC VR and OTOY, is a 16-minute-long experience that combines 360-degree video and photorealistic interactive environments from Majdanek. The studios captured tens of thousands of photos and spent five months painstakingly reconstructing them virtually. And, in a VR first, they also recorded high-quality stereo video of Gutter on-location, which results in an avatar that can believably make eye contact with you. All of that makes The Last Goodbye a VR journey that's as painful as it is immersive.

David Korins, the set designer for the musical Hamilton, developed the installation for The Last Goodbye. It's the size of a small room, with a mirrored exterior that makes it stand out from the plethora of VR showpieces at Tribeca. Going through the experience involves much more than just donning a VR headset: After walking down a small hallway, I met a guide who directed me to take off my shoes as a sign of respect. I then crossed a threshold of pebbles and stepped into the room, which had bare walls and cool ambient lighting. My guide, in a calm and collected voice, described the basics of the experience to me, helped me set up the headset, and left me alone. I took a deep breath and braced myself for what would likely be an emotionally painful journey.

The Last Goodbye begins in Gutter's hotel room, where he's steeling himself for the upcoming trip. He was first sent there with his family when he was 11, and he describes, in heartbreaking detail, the process of how they were stuffed onto a train car with dozens other families. As I started to explore an interactive model of one of those trains, the horrors of the Nazi's genocidal campaign against the Jewish people came starkly into focus. Someone built this thing just to efficiently ship families to their doom.

Article source: https://www.engadget.com/2017/04/22/the-last-goodbye-vr/

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23Apr/170

Recommended Reading: Juicero and the Silicon Valley hype machine

Silicon Valley's $400
Juicer May Be
Feeling the Squeeze

Ellen Huet and
Olivia Zaleski,
Bloomberg

We never bought into the hype of a $700 juicer, but the folks at Juicero were able convince some that its WiFi-connected device was worth the investment. Well, you now only have to hand over $400 as the price dropped since it launched. Unfortunately, the juice packs that the machine uses can be squeezed by hand, which led the company's CEO to offer refunds this week to unsatisfied customers.

Article source: https://www.engadget.com/2017/04/22/recommended-reading-juicero-and-the-silicon-valley-hype-machine/

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23Apr/170

Recommended Reading: Juicero and the Silicon Valley hype machine

Silicon Valley's $400
Juicer May Be
Feeling the Squeeze

Ellen Huet and
Olivia Zaleski,
Bloomberg

We never bought into the hype of a $700 juicer, but the folks at Juicero were able convince some that its WiFi-connected device was worth the investment. Well, you now only have to hand over $400 as the price dropped since it launched. Unfortunately, the juice packs that the machine uses can be squeezed by hand, which led the company's CEO to offer refunds this week to unsatisfied customers.

Article source: https://www.engadget.com/2017/04/22/recommended-reading-juicero-and-the-silicon-valley-hype-machine/

Filed under: Tecnology No Comments
23Apr/170

Recommended Reading: Juicero and the Silicon Valley hype machine

Silicon Valley's $400
Juicer May Be
Feeling the Squeeze

Ellen Huet and
Olivia Zaleski,
Bloomberg

We never bought into the hype of a $700 juicer, but the folks at Juicero were able convince some that its WiFi-connected device was worth the investment. Well, you now only have to hand over $400 as the price dropped since it launched. Unfortunately, the juice packs that the machine uses can be squeezed by hand, which led the company's CEO to offer refunds this week to unsatisfied customers.

Article source: https://www.engadget.com/2017/04/22/recommended-reading-juicero-and-the-silicon-valley-hype-machine/

Filed under: Tecnology No Comments
23Apr/170

‘Avatar’ sequels start arriving on December 18th, 2020

James Cameron has spent years drumming up hype for his Avatar sequels with little to show for it (the first sequel was originally due this December). However, his team is finally ready to commit to specific release dates -- for all the new movies. The production team has revealed that Avatar 2 should arrive on December 18th, 2020, with the rest staggered throughout the next few years. The third movie is slated for December 17th, 2021. There will be a 3-year gap between that and the fourth movie, which debuts on December 20th, 2024. The fifth and final (?) title will appear on December 19th, 2025, 16 years after the first.

Article source: https://www.engadget.com/2017/04/22/avatar-sequel-release-dates/

Filed under: Tecnology No Comments
23Apr/170

‘Avatar’ sequels start arriving on December 18th, 2020

James Cameron has spent years drumming up hype for his Avatar sequels with little to show for it (the first sequel was originally due this December). However, his team is finally ready to commit to specific release dates -- for all the new movies. The production team has revealed that Avatar 2 should arrive on December 18th, 2020, with the rest staggered throughout the next few years. The third movie is slated for December 17th, 2021. There will be a 3-year gap between that and the fourth movie, which debuts on December 20th, 2024. The fifth and final (?) title will appear on December 19th, 2025, 16 years after the first.

Article source: https://www.engadget.com/2017/04/22/avatar-sequel-release-dates/

Filed under: Tecnology No Comments
23Apr/170

‘Avatar’ sequels start arriving on December 18th, 2020

James Cameron has spent years drumming up hype for his Avatar sequels with little to show for it (the first sequel was originally due this December). However, his team is finally ready to commit to specific release dates -- for all the new movies. The production team has revealed that Avatar 2 should arrive on December 18th, 2020, with the rest staggered throughout the next few years. The third movie is slated for December 17th, 2021. There will be a 3-year gap between that and the fourth movie, which debuts on December 20th, 2024. The fifth and final (?) title will appear on December 19th, 2025, 16 years after the first.

Article source: https://www.engadget.com/2017/04/22/avatar-sequel-release-dates/

Filed under: Tecnology No Comments