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25Feb/170

Get your BlackBerry MWC 2017 liveblog right here

It's February, which can mean only one thing: the MWC tanks are rolling into Barcelona. We're expecting to see a lot of new phones and tablets, and the fun starts right here, later today with BlackBerry (via TCL of course). We're expecting to see the final reveal of the "Mercury" phone we saw back at CES. There could be a few more surprises along the way, so be sure to tune in right here at 1PM ET.

Click here to catch up on the latest news from MWC 2017.

Article source: https://www.engadget.com/2017/02/25/blackberry-mwc-2017-liveblog/

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25Feb/170

Our first look at the Nintendo Switch and ‘Breath of the Wild’

The Nintendo Switch is finally here, along with its most anticipated launch title, The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. We're still putting the new console through its paces, but we've put together a quick preview of the hardware and game to tide you over. In short: We're impressed. But the lack of networking functionality, among other features, so close to the console's launch has us worried if Nintendo is totally prepared. Check back for our full review of the Switch and Breath of the Wild next week.

Article source: https://www.engadget.com/2017/02/25/nintendo-switch-zelda-handson/

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25Feb/170

We’re live from MWC 2017 in Barcelona!

It's the end of February, which means we're back in Barcelona once again. For the next few days, we'll bringing you coverage of Mobile World Congress 2017 as the news breaks here in Spain. BlackBerry kicks things off with a press conference this evening before the likes of LG, Motorola, Samsung, Sony and many more take the stage at the start of the week. To easily follow all the announcements as they happen, click the link down below.

Click here to catch up on the latest news from MWC 2017.

Article source: https://www.engadget.com/2017/02/25/were-live-from-mwc-2017-in-barcelona/

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25Feb/170

Recommended Reading: AI and the future of music

We Are the Robots:
Is the Future of
Music Artificial?

Jack Needham,
FACT

Artificial intelligence is invading more of our lives by the day and it's going to work making music as well. FACT takes a look at the use of robots for creative exploits and if we as a collective audience are ready for AI to compose our tunes.

Article source: https://www.engadget.com/2017/02/25/recommended-reading-ai-and-the-future-of-music/

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25Feb/170

BlackBerry’s ‘Mercury’ phone is now the KEYone

What was once known as the BlackBerry "Mercury" is now the KEYone. (Yeah, I don't like the name either.) At a press conference in Barcelona, TCL -- the new steward of BlackBerry's hardware efforts -- introduced, or rather re-introduced, its first Android handset with a QWERTY keyboard. It's a tall, enterprise-friendly smartphone with BlackBerry's DTEK software dumped on top of the OS. You can expect a fairly clean version of Android, but with the BlackBerry Hub and a few other apps aimed at business types. Clearly, this is a niche device -- unlike the DTEK50 and DTEK60, which ditched the physical keyboard, this is a phone for the BlackBerry purists.

Article source: https://www.engadget.com/2017/02/25/blackberry-tcl-keyone-mercury-smartphone/

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25Feb/170

BlackBerry’s KEYone is an exciting return to form

The hardware hasn't changed since the phone broke cover at CES, but we now know what makes it tick. Inside is one of Qualcomm's octa-core Snapdragon 625 chipsets, with an Adreno 506 GPU, 3GB of RAM and 32GB of built-in storage. (Thankfully, you can toss in a microSD card as large as 2TB, just to be safe.) While that's certainly not the fastest slab of silicon out there, BlackBerry Mobile says it chose the processor "very specifically" to work in tandem with the 3,505mAh battery to deliver battery life that can stretch into two full days -- another classic BlackBerry trait the KEYone tries to channel.

I wouldn't worry a whole lot about performance, by the way. We've seen that exact load-out before in devices like the Moto Z Play, and while it won't necessarily blow you away, I was more than pleased with how quick this little thing was. Even with a non-final version of Android 7.1 Nougat onboard, navigating through menus and frenzied multitasking were no problem -- just what you'd want in a device meant specifically to get things done. Up front is that 4.5-inch display running at a slightly odd, 3:2 aspect ratio. Everything on that 1,620x1,080 screen is plenty crisp, though it certainly takes a little getting used to.

To hear the company's pitchmen tell it, the KEYone was purpose-built for people who appreciated the things that made old-school BlackBerrys so great. It stands to reason that the people involved agonized over the keyboard, and they've done a great job: I've used every BlackBerry with a physical QWERTY since the BB10 days and I'm pretty pleased with how the keys depress and spring back into place. It'll take a lot of re-training to get my chubby thumbs weaned off a glass touchscreen, but even a few moments with the KEYone made me feel like I was up to the challenge. Even better, you can slide your fingers across the keyboard to swipe between home-screens and down webpages. Every key also doubles a shortcut for an app or action -- think holding down the L button to launch Lyft -- and I'm seriously thinking of buying a KEYone just for that.

That functionality sits nicely on top of BlackBerry's spin on Android, and very little of it has changed since the days of the DTEK50 and DTEK60. Now we're getting to that other thing BlackBerry has pushed for decades. The main draw (beyond the keyboard, natch) is the hardened kernel BlackBerry has worked to bake into Android itself -- spokespeople eagerly call it the most secure Android device in the world, and apps like DTEK should help even lay-people figure out how to make their phones a little safer.

Then there's the other stuff needed to play in the big leagues. BlackBerrys have never been great at cameras, but they went surprisingly big with the KEYone. Tucked away in the phone's back is one of Sony's 12-megapixel IMX378 camera sensors, like the one seen in Google's Pixel and Pixel XL. I didn't get much time to play with the camera in bright daylight, but the photos I did shoot were fairly detailed and well colored, even in low light. The Pixels use a lot of really impressive machine learning to make photos taken with their cameras really pop, so don't expect the KEYone to steal Google's imaging crown. Even though the software driving it still needs some fine-tuning, the KEYone's camera seems leagues ahead of those used in other BlackBerrys.

Ultimately, the phone's designers didn't want to build a phone for everyone, or a phone that excelled at everything. They tried that once with the Priv, and you probably remember how that went. (Quick reminder: it was mostly just OK). This new-found focus is both refreshing and intelligent. BlackBerry Mobile openly admits the KEYone is a total niche phone, but considers it an important part of the growing BlackBerry portfolio. Building a strong foundation of phones is how BlackBerry and TCL plan to turn things around, and at least some of the carriers that didn't love the Priv are taking note.

The KEYone is set to launch in multiple markets in April, and we're hearing that the US is lower on the list than other places. Fair enough. Even so, the company confirmed that, in addition to being sold unlocked for $549, carriers will almost certainly offer the KEYone too. That's good news for you -- you can pay for one by the month -- and even better for BlackBerry. Carrier deals mean more visibility, and they could definitely use it. As I've said, we'll hold off on passing judgment until we get to play with some final hardware, but I feel something for BlackBerry now the company hasn't given in me years: cautious excitement.

Click here to catch up on the latest news from MWC 2017.

Article source: https://www.engadget.com/2017/02/25/blackberry-keyone-mercury-official-hands-on/

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25Feb/170

Six Flags’ new VR roller coaster is both breathtaking and broken

This wasn't the experience I was expecting. After all, Galactic Attack isn't Six Flags' first virtual reality roller coaster. Between the park's experience and my personal love of VR, I was looking forward to a smooth ride. My optimism disintegrated when my VR headset froze during one of the ride's first twists. Twice, the view in my Gear VR headset halted for more than a second, leaping forward to "catch up" with the speeding ride vehicle and creating a gap between what my eyes were seeing and the g-forces my body was experiencing. It was nauseating. If everything had gone as intended, I probably would have come away thrilled by a high-speed VR space combat experience that perfectly synced with the roller coaster's track. Instead, I was fighting a headache brought on by simulator sickness.

This isn't the typical riding experience, but it's not unprecedented. Park officials told me that most guests are treated to a smooth virtual reality adventure, but certain seats on the ride vehicle have a higher chance of losing synchronization with the track. It's a Bluetooth problem. Each headset connects to a black box mounted above the seats near the center of the car. On straightaways and loops, this hub can easily reach every rider's Gear VR headset, but sometimes, tight twists and inversions can briefly put the roller coaster's steel track between a specific user and the black box, breaking the Bluetooth connection just long enough to stall the simulation.

Six Flags' representative told me it was enough of a problem that one of the park's earlier VR roller coasters barred users from using Gear VR headsets in the front row, and the transmitter has since been moved to a location that minimizes the issue. Minimizes, yes, but doesn't eliminate.

Perhaps I'm being too harsh. When the virtual reality space battle wasn't frozen, it was breathtaking. It started off by showing me the real world through the Gear VR's passthrough camera before drawing the roller coaster through an augmented reality wormhole to deep space. There, I was more than a passenger; I was a participant, playing a fast-paced action game that tasked me with shooting down alien fighter pilots while being rocketed through the chaos of a massive space battle. I walked away intrigued by the experience, but I was still nauseated. Enough so that every time I thought about riding Galactic Attack again, I felt sick.

If you ride Six Flags Discovery Kingdom's Galactic Attack VR roller coaster, you probably won't have the broken, frozen VR experience I endured. Park staff told me it happens only on a few seats at the front of the car, and even then, only rarely. Six Flags maintenance supervisor Charles Laureano claims that most riders don't get sick at all. "The New Revolution Galactic Attack roller coaster is synched precisely with the coaster's drops, twists and turns," he said in a statement. "Because of this, riders are not affected by motion sickness as some might expect when on a VR coaster." Indeed, park staff told me that sitting in the middle and rear seats will offer a more consistent experience, but a potentially nauseating ride shouldn't even be an option -- not even if the chances of failure are low.

Theme parks have always been centers of innovation, and virtual reality has the potential to be the next big revolution in ride technology -- but harnessing that potential means accepting responsibility for it. Right now, Six Flags has a VR roller coaster system that sees failure as inevitable. The fact that my broken, stomach-churning VR experience was a known but acceptable issue is, frankly, unacceptable. I'm lucky to have a high-end VR headset at home, but many people will experience virtual reality for the first time on a roller coaster. They deserve to have that first foray into a digital realm be safe, exhilarating and free from avoidable simulator sickness.

Article source: https://www.engadget.com/2017/02/25/six-flags-vr-roller-coaster/

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25Feb/170

Draft 5G specs lay the groundwork for a real standard

With all the hype around early 5G launches and tests, there's one glaring problem: the telecom industry hasn't really defined what 5G is. However, the super-fast wireless is starting to take shape. The International Telecommunication Union has published draft 5G specs that set performance expectations. As a user, you should get 100Mbps download speeds and 50Mbps for uploads -- unlike with LTE, though, that's more of a consistent baseline than a theoretical maximum. You should also see extremely low lag of no more than 4ms (versus 20ms for LTE), and service should work on trains traveling as quickly as 500km/h (311MPH). In short, this should be as fast as a good home internet connection.

Article source: https://www.engadget.com/2017/02/25/itu-draft-5g-specs/

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25Feb/170

iPhone muggers turn to phishing to access the device

Further, the link leads to exact replicas of Apple's and Find my iPhone's log-in pages. The couple even got a call from a Siri-like robotic voice asking them to look for the text message for more info about their "recovered" phone. Clearly, it's a well-thought-out scheme by tech-savvy muggers: rob people and then phish them to get their passwords.

The victim's husband wanted to get the word out, since the scheme can definitely dupe anyone who's not that familiar with phishing attempts. It's also a good reminder to switch on Find My iPhone, so you can lock or erase it remotely if anything like this happens.

Article source: https://www.engadget.com/2017/02/25/iphone-muggers-phishing/

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25Feb/170

Buon Carnevale 2017: migliori immagini per WhatsApp

Festeggiare Buon Carnevale è più semplice con immagini per WhatsApp. Il periodo che precede la Quaresima, celebrato con feste mascherate, sfilate di carri allegorici, danze e baldorie termina con il martedì grasso. Quindi, per festeggiare Carnevale 2017 non possono mancare immagini divertenti, simpatiche e originali da condividere su WhatsApp, Facebook, Instagram e altri social network. Scoprite assieme a noi quali siano le migliori immagini di Buon Carnevale 2017.

Prima di scoprire quali siano le migliori immagini per Buon Carnevale 2017, ti suggeriamo di alcune applicazioni di terze parti per Android e iOS per creare collage, in modo divertente e simpatico.

Per quanto riguarda il sistema operativo Android, Photo Collage Editor è una tra le migliori app per festeggiare Carnevale 2017 visto che è completamente gratuita e può essere scaricata direttamente dal Google Play Store.

In alternativa, se possiedi un dispositivo con sistema operativo iOS, come iPhone, iPod Touch o iPad, puoi sfruttare le funzioni offerte da Pic Collage. Si tratta di un’app con cui creare collage di immagini, scegliendo tra vari layout e con la possibilità di aggiungere sticker, testo, GIF e molte altre tipologie di contenuti.

Infine, come promesso, in questo articolo ti proponiamo una carrellata di immagini simpatiche e divertenti per WhatsApp, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram e altri social network. Se desideri inviare immagini per festeggiare e augurare Buon Carnevale 2017, sei nel posto giusto.

Article source: http://www.tecnocino.it/2017/02/articolo/buon-carnevale-2017-migliori-immagini-per-whatsapp/87255/

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